Home   Logon   Mobile Site   Research and Commentary   About Us   Call 1.800.621.1675 or Email Us       Follow Us: 

Search by Ticker, Keyword or CUSIP       
 
 

Blog Home
   Brian Wesbury
Chief Economist
 
Click for Bio
Follow Brian on Twitter Follow Brian on LinkedIn View Videos on YouTube
   Bob Stein
Deputy Chief Economist
Click for Bio
Follow Bob on Twitter Follow Bob on LinkedIn View Videos on YouTube
 
  The Bull Keeps Running
Posted Under: Bullish • Markets • Monday Morning Outlook • Bonds • Stocks

In March 2009, the stock market started its current bull run.  At first, it was a V-shaped bounce from the 2008 Panic lows after mark-to-market accounting was changed.

Next, as the economy recovered, earnings drove stocks higher.  But, between May 19, 2015 and November 3, 2016, the Dow Jones Industrials Average actually fell 2%, while other indices stagnated.  A sharp drop in earnings (due to lower oil prices) and election uncertainty caused angst.

Since then, however, the Dow is up 19% and the tech-heavy NASDAQ is up 22%.  Good policy ideas beget good stock market outcomes.

Last December we set our year-end 2017 stock market targets at 23,750 for the Dow and 2,700 for the S&P 500.

At the time, these targets seemed wildly bullish to many investors.  Now?  Not so much. We need barely more than an 11% increase in each index to hit those targets. 

We weren't counting on better tax, spending and regulatory policy to reach those targets, but if that happens, our targets might be too low!

We use a Capitalized Profits Model (the government's measure of profits from the GDP reports divided by interest rates) to measure fair value for stocks.  Using a current 10-year Treasury yield of about 2.3% says the S&P 500 is massively undervalued.  We won't tell you the number because we think the Fed is holding interest rates artificially low.

Using a more rational 10-year yield of 3.5%, fair value for the S&P 500 is 2,700, which is our target.  The model needs a 10-year yield of 3.9% to conclude the S&P 500 is already at fair value, with current profits.

As always, it's important to recognize we are not market timers and aren't saying a correction won't, or can't, happen.  Corrections come and go.  But market timers get burned time after time.  In other words, if another correction hits in the near future, stay long and buy more.

Late last year we thought the Fed could do four rate hikes in 2017.  It now looks like three.  And with over $2 trillion in excess reserves, the Fed is a very, very long way from creating a tight money environment if and when its starts to unwind QE.

One change to the financial picture is on long-term interest rates.  Six months ago, we thought the 10-year Treasury yield would finish 2017 at 3.25%.  Now we think 3.00%.  That's a headwind for fixed-income investors, but with growing profits, rising rates are less of a problem for equity holders.

As has been true since 2009, those who stay optimistic will be richly rewarded.  Especially with a better set of fiscal policies.  Stay optimistic and stay invested.

Brian S. Wesbury - Chief Economist
Robert Stein, CFA – Deputy Chief Economist
  

Click here for PDF version

Posted on Monday, July 3, 2017 @ 10:50 AM • Post Link Share: 
Print this post Printer Friendly

These posts were prepared by First Trust Advisors L. P., and reflect the current opinion of the authors. They are based upon sources and data believed to be accurate and reliable. Opinions and forward looking statements expressed are subject to change without notice. This information does not constitute a solicitation or an offer to buy or sell any security.
 
The information presented is not intended to constitute an investment recommendation for, or advice to, any specific person. By providing this information, First Trust is not undertaking to give advice in any fiduciary capacity within the meaning of ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code. First Trust has no knowledge of and has not been provided any information regarding any investor. Financial advisors must determine whether particular investments are appropriate for their clients. First Trust believes the financial advisor is a fiduciary, is capable of evaluating investment risks independently and is responsible for exercising independent judgment with respect to its retirement plan clients.
First Trust Portfolios L.P.  Member SIPC and FINRA.
First Trust Advisors L.P.
Home |  Important Legal Information |  Privacy Policy |  Business Continuity Plan |  FINRA BrokerCheck
Copyright © 2018 All rights reserved.